Bettering Indoor Air Quality – The Airdoctor 3000 And EPA’s Indoor Air Programs

Being able to breathe without any difficulty, especially if you have heart or lung problems, is such a great feeling. Exposure to pollution or contaminants in the air can affect one’s health. Either it causes or aggravates symptoms of heart diseases, like oxygen deprivation and artery blockages that leads to heart attacks, as well as respiratory ailments, like cough, difficulty breathing, and congestion of the upper airway.

Airdoctor 3000 – Improving Indoor Air Quality And Health

Air pollution isn’t only present outdoors but can also exist indoors. Hence it is vital to have good indoor air quality as well. In this case, air purifiers like the airdoctor 3000 can help improve the quality of air indoors. Several of the possible benefits of making use of an air purifier are linked to the lungs or respiratory system. As air purifiers filter out fine particles, they help in cleaning the air that we breather and lower the potential adverse effects of air pollution.

The airdoctor 3000 is engineered to eliminate pollutants and allergens in the air because of its multilevel filtration system. The layers of filters include:

  • A pre-filter layer that gets rid of the majority of bigger particles, such as pet fur, lint, and dusts.
  • A layer of activated carbon that is pellet-based which eliminates different odors and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as chemicals emitted by cosmetics and paints.
  • An “UltraHEPA” filter layer does the majority of the work that remains. The filter provides that added purification capability to remove 0.003 micron sized particles, including dust particles, airborne microbes, traffic pollutants, smoke, and more.

Programs For Better Indoor Air by the Environmental Protection Agency

Air pollution is pollutants released in the air which are harmful not only to human health but also to the entire planet. The World Health Organization stated that air pollution is the cause of almost seven million deaths across the globe every year. Out of ten human beings, nine are presently breathing air that surpasses the guideline of the WHO on the limits for pollutants, wherein those who suffer the most are those who are living in countries with low-income and middle-income.

To reduce air pollution, improve air quality and protect the health if its people, governments of different countries have their own laws and programs. In the United States, the Clean Air Act was instituted in 1970 which gave authority to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) of the U.S. to safeguard the health of the public by regulating the emissions brought about by these unsafe and detrimental air pollutants.

When it comes to indoor air quality, the EPA promotes various indoor air programs to aid in lowering air contaminants indoors, like in the homes, in schools, as well as in the workplace. Indoor air programs for the home would include disseminating info on the best practices for reducing radon, remodeling, guidance and recommendation on proper and ample ventilation, as well as effective chemical-free methods to for eliminating and controlling pests.

Indoor air programs in schools are also a focus since there are several sources in schools that contribute to indoor air pollution, such science, art, and cleaning supplies, molds and dust mites that triggers asthma, and exhaust from vehicles (school buses and private cars). So as to help determine and lessen these indoor air pollution sources, there is an action kit provided by the EPA for schools. Similarly, there are numerous factors in office buildings that cause air pollution indoors. To address this, the EPA has collaborated with experienced engineers as well as with architect and building associations to create a guide for indoor air design for architects, contractors, and design engineers. This guide provides them with free reference materials for the public and building professionals.